Basic exercise to develop horse stability in front of an obstacle
Description of the exercise: tips from the poles in front of the obstacle in the form of a cross and a pole adjacent to it. It is necessary to place…

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Thoroughbred horse breed description
It is known that England is the birthplace of a thoroughbred horse breed of horses. It was bred in the XVII-XVIII centuries. based on local and imported horse breeds. At…

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Thoroughbred horse breed description
It is known that England is the birthplace of a thoroughbred horse breed of horses. It was bred in the XVII-XVIII centuries. based on local and imported horse breeds. At…

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High School Riding Elements – School Jumping

During high school jumps above the ground, which include cockbet, lansada, ballotad and capriole, the horse is separated by all four limbs. School jumps are exceptional in their beauty and require great skill from the coach and the courage of the rider. Contrary to the opinion that school jumping is overly artificial and asserting that it is not typical for a horse, let us cite the statement of the famous German coach L. Zener, who prepared many horses for school jumping: “A school jump is as natural for a well-built horse as the three main the gait is a step, a lynx and a gallop, and one should not fearfully avoid these jumps. ”
Horses that have a strong back, powerful hind legs with massive hock joints can only be taught school jumps when they fully obey the shankel and occasion, it is easy to perform piaffe with good work on the joints of the hind legs. Excessively large and heavy horses are not suitable for school jumping.

Kurbet – a school jump, in which the horse rises from piaffe to the pesada, under the influence of stewing and the voice of the trainer makes a jump up and forward and lands on its hind limbs. The French name for this technique means jumping in an arc. Since the horse during the coubet not only balances its severity and the severity of the rider on its hind legs, but also pushes off the ground, perceives this heaviness upon landing and again makes the jump, its hip and hock joints are significantly bent, experiencing excessive stress. Therefore, it is not recommended too often to make these jumps under the rider.

Kurbet first practiced “in the hands.” The horse, confidently performing the pesada, is put in the pilars to the denouement, and then stubbed with whip along its hock joints, forcing to make a jump up. After a good jump, the horse is fed and this is the end of the work. After some time, a light and very skilled rider can be mounted on a horse, which, while maintaining a calm landing, does not interfere with it during this difficult jump.
The denouement should be fastened so that the horse has a small emphasis corresponding to the jump. With long interchanges, the horse will raise the front part too high and will not be able to balance as it is necessary for pushing away, or will take too long a leap forward, lose balance and hit when lowering on the pilar nose belt and lose confidence. Too short interchanges prevent the horse from not only raising the front, but also jumping. The uniformity of the interchanges is mandatory, and when sending forward (tousing), it is necessary to simultaneously act on both hind legs so that repulsion occurs with both legs at once. Otherwise, the horse can push off with one leg and get an oblique jump. It’s best to stew with two whips.
There are many horses that perfectly perform pesades and levada n, therefore, possessing sufficient strength to perform a kurbet, however, only a few horses possess not only strength, but also the ability to balance, which is necessary for kurbet, as well as dexterity and courage.
Work in the pilasters should not be stopped until the necessary confidence appears for both the horse and the rider when working outside the pilasters, the piaffe rider raises the horse on the pesada, and when it is balanced on the pesada, it forces it to push off, amplifying the pressure with the shenkels, clicks tongue and lowers his hands down and slightly forward, so that the horse gets the freedom she needs to jump forward.
Initially, the cockbet should be performed with an assistant, who becomes behind with a scourge at some distance from the horse. He does not touch the horse, but his presence greatly facilitates the task of the rider. After a successful kurbet, the rider again puts the horse on the piaffe and, if the condition of the horse allows, requires her to perform several more kurbets. Finishing work after the kurbets, you must definitely make a few piaffe paces. During the execution of the cockbet, special attention should be paid to ensure that the horse is always on straight schenkels and reins, otherwise it may incorrectly (in one direction) push off onto the jump and begin to “spin”.

High School Riding Elements – School Jumping

Lansada – so in high school riding is called a horse jump forward to the front legs with well-bent hind legs. In the usual movement, a hot horse makes lansads, wanting to tear out an occasion or bring down a rider.
Kruppada – a jump from the pesada (on the spot), in which the horse, having separated from the ground with his legs selected, falls to the same place.
The horse is encouraged to jump by lightly pulling the croup. When kruppad, going on a jump, the front of the horse is slightly higher than the rear. The horse pulls all four legs under the body, with the horseshoes of the hind legs pointing to the ground. The horse’s hull subsequently takes a horizontal position, from which it lands on all four legs exactly to the place from which it pushed

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