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The phrase “negative reinforcement” often causes misunderstanding. Yes, many people know this term, but hesitate to give it a clear definition. So, let's start from the very beginning: negative reinforcement…

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Riding without stirrups
Exercises without stirrups are designed to improve the fit, help develop the right balance and make the position of the legs deeper and stronger. The rider should try to sit…

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Basic exercise to develop horse stability in front of an obstacle
Description of the exercise: tips from the poles in front of the obstacle in the form of a cross and a pole adjacent to it. It is necessary to place…

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How an amateur rider can overcome fear in favor of concentration

Trainer Annette Paterakis shared the story of her student Katie McNair to show how amateur riders can gain confidence.

Katie faced concentration problems that led the rider to disappointing results in the competition. Moreover, as a mother, it was difficult for her to distribute time and attention between family and horses. However, her story shows that you can find a balance between the areas of your life and at the same time achieve success in sports.

Annette Katie was advised by her trainer, Sally Amsterdamer. Katie returned to the saddle after a break, which she took for the sake of arranging her family life, but returning to the saddle turned out to be an unsuccessful fall in competitions and a hip fracture. This, in turn, led to a fear of more serious and higher jumps.

For two years Katie struggled with the fear left over from the fall. According to the athlete, already at the warm-up she began to torment unpleasant memories. These feelings leaked into Katie’s personal life.

Her self-confidence decreased markedly, and attempts to properly distribute attention between training, caring for horses and the happiness of children only increased the rider’s stress. Feeling maternal guilt depressed her, household chores did not want to get out of her head even during training, and Katie was already sure that she simply could not achieve anything more in sports.

The first step to rectifying this difficult situation was Katie’s decision that competition results should not interfere with riding pleasure. When she turned to Annette, she began with an explanation of the basic things: how the brain of a person under pressure works, why, for stable success in competitions, it is important first of all to establish certain habits that alleviate psychological stress.

However, even this caused problems. The first goal for Katie was to devote 10 minutes exclusively to herself every morning. This time had to be reduced to 2 minutes, so that the new “custom” was uncomplicated and easily fit into the regime. It is in these properties that Annette sees the key to gradually forming a set of “healthy habits”.

Annette and Katie started with three of these habits. The first is breathing exercises in the morning. The second is to give a minute to direct contact with each horse. The third is to choose one thing that the athlete would fully focus on during the competition. This set gave the result: Katie began to feel calmer and more confident in the saddle, the results in tournaments began to improve. So, the rider has a motivation for further psychological work on herself.

With Annette’s help, Katie began planning her day in advance in the evening. This helped organize my actions and thoughts (which, as Annette points out, around 60,000 per day flash in our head). The athlete’s concentration began to improve, and in six months she went from a tough fight with jumps 120 centimeters high to 140 success.

Katie believes that sometimes athletes forget how much horses try for them, and, as a result, deserve one hundred percent attention and concentration in response. Thanks to working on herself under the leadership of Annette, she learned to enjoy training regardless of the results and completely devote herself to the process of working with the horse.

Passed the way helped Katie and inchildren. Now she herself teaches them to believe in themselves, to cope with difficulties and to move forward. Katie thanks Annette for her life lesson.

Katie faced concentration problems that led the rider to disappoint relationships with ing results in the competition. Moreover, as a mother, it was difficult for her to distribute time and attention between family and horses. However, her story shows that you can find a balance between the areas of your life and at the same time achieve success in sports.

Annette Katie was advised by her trainer, Sally Amsterdamer. Katie returned to the saddle after a break, which she took for the sake of arranging her family life, but returning to the saddle turned out to be an unsuccessful fall in competitions and a hip fracture. This, in turn, led to a fear of more serious and higher jumps.

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