Learning to work without stirrups
Riding without stirrups can significantly improve your fit, however, only if you work correctly without experiencing insecurity and not only thinking about staying in the saddle. In this article you…

Continue reading →

Negative reinforcement in horse training: pros and cons
The phrase “negative reinforcement” often causes misunderstanding. Yes, many people know this term, but hesitate to give it a clear definition. So, let's start from the very beginning: negative reinforcement…

Continue reading →

Effect of soil quality on horse jumping skills
A small but important explanation of the significance of the ground in the preparation of a show jumping horse. The horse’s desire to jump is largely determined by its confidence…

Continue reading →

Horses that bite

Many horses are far from seriously biting aggressively. But any horse that bites is potentially dangerous to communicate with and work with. All horses can be made to think that biting a person is not acceptable. In this article, firstly, I will talk about generally accepted methods for biting horses, along with all the problems that I see in them. Then we will talk about how to teach a horse to respect the place around us and explain the coaching techniques for several types of “biteers”. Enjoy-
Commonly used “solutions” for biting horses:
These methods sometimes work with some horses. However, I see many flaws in them. I will explain why they do not work with every horse and in all situations. And I advise you to stay away from these methods.
? Squirt the horse’s lemon juice in her mouth, she won’t like the taste ¦
Using lemon has worked for many people, but the only problem I see here is that you cannot use it constantly. Sometimes you may not have a lemon in your hand, and you can’t always be on the stream to spray juice into the horse’s mouth. Another drawback is when you spray lemon juice into the horse’s mouth because it tastes bad, the horse does not learn that biting a person is bad and unacceptable, she only understands that lemon juice is disgusting. So, until you constantly walk with a lemon in your hand in anticipation of the opportunity when the horse can bite you, this method will not bring the desired result.
? Just don’t stick your fingers in her mouth¦
Of course, this is good advice when you don’t know the horse you are talking to, but there can be many times when you or someone else needs to put your fingers into the horse’s mouth. A good example of this is an examination of the teeth, when the horse should calmly relate to the fingers in her mouth and not bite them off! Again, this method will not teach the horse that biting is bad and unacceptable. In addition, you can’t always prevent your fingers from getting into her mouth. And if she is a serious nipper, she will find a way to bite you wherever she reaches.
? Try the muzzle?
And again, this method does not teach the horse not to bite you, it only prevents bites while the horse is muzzled. When I see when the owner is leading his horse, dressed in this way, it only shows me that the owner can not communicate with the horse properly, while he is protecting himself from this behavior, and not correcting it.
“Hit the horse on the head, neck or shoulder”
The first drawback that I see in this advice is that most foals and some geldings will take this as a call to war. Stallions fight with front legs and teeth. If you hit a stallion or gelding on the head, neck or shoulder, you can eventually get the horse to stand on a candle and seal you with a hoof. Another problem here is that many horses begin to be afraid of any touch on the head if they are often beaten on it.
Well, before that we talked only about methods that either do not work at all, or work in some cases or with some horses. Let’s move on to the things that actually work.
Respect my space
First, any horse that I train is not allowed inside my personal space, until it earns the right to be there. And from now on, she should be “invited” there. I NEVER allow horses that bite to stand next to me. I ask them to stand a couple of meters from me, until they learn to respect my space. I never let a horse touch me until she is invited to do so.
Horses in a herd use a similar technique. Many dominant horses will not allow others into their space until they begin to respect it. Until then, he will ask them to keep their distance, sending them away with body language. And when you ask the horse to stand at some distance from you, you show it that you are dominating. If you told her to stay at a distance, and she decides to come up without your invitation or call, then you must expel her until she stands calmly and patiently waiting for the “invitation”.
For more information on how to teach a horse to respect your space, read the article “Build respect! ¦ in the work on earth section.
Horses that? Teasing¦-
For horses that don’t bite, but keep “bothering” you (most young horses do this), there is a solution: give them more attention than they want. When a horse starts rubbing against me with lips or tugging at my fingers, hands, etc., I immediately grab her face in both hands and start to rub it back and forth. Not too much, as it hurts, but you should pat it enough so that the place becomes warm and the horse feels uncomfortable. Then the horse will take his head away.

Tennessee horse
46 years of torture of a unique breed of horses justified by the state. If we look at the description of this breed, it will be said that the Tennessee…

...

High School Riding Elements - School Jumping
During high school jumps above the ground, which include cockbet, lansada, ballotad and capriole, the horse is separated by all four limbs. School jumps are exceptional in their beauty and…

...

Riding without stirrups
Exercises without stirrups are designed to improve the fit, help develop the right balance and make the position of the legs deeper and stronger. The rider should try to sit…

...

Horse Games
Horse Relays Competitions of teams to overcome obstacles with any precondition: transfer of a whip from one rider to another, touch, re-seat with one saddle, start from a fenced area,…

...